Mural Advertisment Painters, Manhattan

Interesting 10 minute documentary on the ad muralist of Manhattan.

UP THERE from Jon on Vimeo.

via  A Time To Get

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The Shindler Garden

Nice layering + textures. Via Dig it

Mini Concrete Towers

I really love these little (spray paint) buildings that have been popping up c/o Berlin-based street artist, EVOL.

via Freshome

County Cork Painter’s Studio

Found my little home in Ireland!  It actually looks larger than it is, standing with only about 500 sq/ft, with the stairs, kitchen and bathroom all designed like that of a ship.. tiny and compact.

via ArchDaily

Willoughby Design Barn

Weston, MO | 2001 by El Dorado

Ann Willoughby desired a structure to complement her existing 1880s farmhouse on her working farm outside of Kansas City, Missouri. She utilizes the structure as an event space in connection with Willoughby Design Group, her identity design firm. Aside from the industrial and agricultural functions that comprise the lower level of the barn, the program includes an open event space, an insulated and climate controlled utility/toilet area, and a sleeping loft. The barn frame, purchased by the client in the spring of 1998, was originally located in Highland, Kansas. Carefully sited in its new home, it is sheathed in corrugated copper and fiberglass panels.

Miniatur Wunderland

If you ever are in Hamburg and you fell like overloading on all things small, visit Miniatur Wunderland.   If you liked the opening sequence to Mr.Rogers, visit Miniatur Wunderland.

Material Focus: Expanded Metal

Expanded aluminum,  stainless, copper- the list goes on.  If it is a metal sheet, chances are it can be expanded.  This process is great, because there is not as much wasted material as there is when perforating  metal. With expanded metal, the metal is slit and pulled into to shape (or expanded). Perforated metal is punched or cut out, leaving waste blanks.

It has a fairly clear visual impact, is relatively inexpensive, and is usually very strong for it’s weight.  Maybe the visual impact is too strong- conjuring prisions, paddywagons, and industrial storage & machine cages. Available in a wide range of patterns, metals and gauges of metal, it seems like it warrants more use.  Tiny expanded silver, someone?

images via Flickr streams and Google images

Chicken Point Cabin, Tom Kundig

Tom Kundig is among maybe my top 2 or 3 favorite architects. My lovely wife introduced me to his work  by giving me a great book on him, Tom Kundig: Houses. Among many others, this book covers the “Chicken Point Cabin” project, one of my favorites.  There is definitely something very warm about his work, while having a spacial severity at the same time. If I ever have the chance to design and build my own place, I am going to steal ideas from him shamelessly.

While The Warriors Roam, NYC 1973

Pretty astounding set of photos from the US National Archives, all from the summer of ’73.

Vacation House Eye Candy

I don’t know much about this house other than I’d like to live there.

Photos by John Brown

Wood Stoves

It’s not that cold in Brooklyn today, but it is pretty damp from the melting heaps of snow, and generally chilly. No matter how high I set our forced air natural gas heater, it never seems warm, it is either chilly or hot. Our cat knows what I am talking about, he is painted to my lap this time of year. So, some wood stoves, which are always warm.

Images via Flickr

Newbern Fire Station / Town Hall

This is not a new rural studio project, it’s from 2004, but I like it and figure y’all may as well.  I really can’t get enough Rural Studio.

The project page states:

Newbern, Hale County, Alabama

Thesis Project 2003-2004
Will Brothers, Matthew Finley, Elizabeth Ellington, Leia Price.

Project description
The Newbern Volunteer Fire Department and Town Hall is the first new public building in Newbern for 110 years. It houses three fire trucks and satisfies the town’s needs for a place to house elections, council meetings, volunteer firefighter classes, fund-raising and community gatherings.

The building is supported by a wood and metal truss structure, which is enclosed by translucent polycarbonate panels, protected from the sun by cedar slats and topped-off with a galvanized aluminum roof. Inside there is a mezzanine level for fire fighting classes and at the ground floor a bathroom and kitchen.

An extraordinary effort by four students. Not only was the project conceived and built in just two years, but at the same time student Leia Price raised $100,000 in materials donations.

Old Taylor Distillery

The Old Taylor Distillery… The bourbon castle + 83 acres are for sale…

Quoted from EllenJaye.com….

Colonel Edmund H. Taylor began his distillery-owner’s career at the O.F.C. distillery in Leestown (which later became Ancient Age). After turning over ownership to his partner George T. Stagg, Taylor built a new distillery on Glenn’s Creek. It has been called one of the most remarkable sights in the bourbon industry. The main distillery building is made entirely of limestone blocks, in the form of a medieval castle, complete with turrets. A drawing of the castle appears on the label of Old Taylor Bourbon. The castle wasn’t just a facade, either; inside were gardens and ornate rooms where Colonel Taylor used to entertain important government officials and politicians. Taylor’s contribution was the guarantee of quality in an industry that had lost nearly all credibility. Very few distillers were selling quality product, and virtually none of what good bourbon was being made ever got to the public without being diluted, polluted, and rectified. Edmund Taylor crusaded tirelessly to have laws passed that would ensure quality product, and he was successful. He was the originator of what became known as the Bottled-in-Bond act of 1897. This was essentially a federal subsidy by tax deferral for product made to strict government standards and stored under government supervision. In the process, he was responsible for documenting what those standards would be. And therefore, Edmund H. Taylor, Jr. was given the task of defining Straight Bourbon Whiskey. As a result of the success of this act, other federally enforced standards for food products were enacted, and we can say we owe much of our current standards in many consumable products to this gentleman with a distillery on Glenn’s Creek.



If you have dreamed of your own private “Elsinore“  this historic home of Bourbon can now be your’s for 1.9M.

Architectural Surfaces & Shacks, Marie Ringwald

Artist’s site here.

Abandoned Mens Club, Selma Alabama

This space was featured in the New York Times Home & Garden Section earlier this month, so I am sure many of you saw it, but just in case you missed this great space…

The spaces remind me of the beautiful decayed interiors shown in Rober Polidori’s great photo book, Havana

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